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Register your business

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Register your business

Our Legal document Preparer can help you you file and register your business with the Secretary of States. We not only register your business either C or S corp, LLC but we make sure that your business is setting up correctly with out future problem. We will assist you what identity is best for your business. You will get first hand knowledge of how would you handle your business and what tax benefit will be best for you.

 We not only register or file for your business but its include evaluation of your business model. We help you from start to end. We want you to concentrate on how to run your business and leave everything to us.

Why using Us – We had register hundreds of business in California and most of our business is from referal that prove we had been doing something right. If you want to register your business the right way then you had have come to the right place.

C corporation

 When registering a company, C corporation or C corp is the most common corporation type, but it isn’t always the top choice for small business owners. C corporations provide limited liability protection to owners, who are called shareholders, meaning owners are typically not personally responsible for business debts and liabilities. Starting a C corporation may also offer greater tax advantages because of an expanded ability to deduct employee benefits, which are most often used by growing businesses.

C corp advantages

Starting a C corporation typically provides a number of advantages:

  • Limited liability protection. Owners are not typically responsible for business debts and liabilities.
  • Unlimited owners. C corps can have an unlimited number of shareholders.
  • Easy transfer of ownership. Ownership is easily transferable through the sale of stock.
  • Unlimited life. When a C corporation’s owner incurs a disabling illness or dies, the corporation does not cease to exist.
  • Owners take reasonable salaries. Salaries paid to owners of C Corporations, though taxable to them as salary, are deducted from C Corp profits for income tax purposes.
  • Owners are not automatically taxed on business earnings. In contrast to pass-through entities like LLCs, earnings of a C Corporation are not automatically taxed to the owners. They are taxed to owners if distributed as dividends. The C Corp pays tax on its income at C Corp tax rates.
  • Raise capital more easily. Additional capital can be raised by selling shares of stock.
  • Retained earnings inside the business. A C Corp could successfully retain earnings for reasonable business needs, if it complies with the accumulated earnings tax provisions, instead of distributing them to shareholders.
  • Credibility. C Corps may be perceived as a more professional/legitimate entity than a sole proprietorship or general partnership.
  • Lower audit risk. Generally C corporations are audited less frequently than sole proprietorships.
  • Tax deductible expenses. Business expenses may be tax-deductible.
  • Self-employment tax savings. A C corporation can offer self-employment tax savings, since owners who work for the business are classified as employees.

S corporation

corps are corporations that have elected a special tax status with the IRS. S corporations provide the same limited liability to owners (called shareholders) as C corporations, meaning that owners typically are not personally responsible for business debt and liabilities; however, S corporations have pass-through taxation. S corps do not pay tax at the business level, they file an informational tax return but business income/loss is reported on the owners’ personal tax returns, and any tax due is paid at the individual level.

S corp advantages

Forming an S corporation has many advantages. Many small business owners form a corporation and elect S corp status for pass-through taxation. Other typical advantages of forming an S corporation include:

  • Limited liability protection. Owners are not typically responsible for S corporation business debts and liabilities
  • Easy transfer of ownership. Ownership is easily transferable through the sale of stock.
  • Unlimited life. When a S corporation’s owner incurs a disabling illness or dies, the corporation does not cease to exist.
  • Pass-through taxation in the corporate form. S corporation tax status avoids the “double-taxation” associated with C Corps and instead provides S corp owners with pass-through taxation benefits.
  • Raise capital more easily. Additional capital can be raised by selling shares of stock.
  • Credibility. S Corps may be perceived as a more professional/legitimate entity than a sole proprietorship or general partnership. Learn more about sole proprietorship vs s corp.
  • Pro-rata distribution of profits. Under IRS S corp taxation rules, profits, losses and other pass through items are allocated based on each shareholder’s proportionate shares of stock.
  • Income and losses passed through to shareholders. Income and losses of S corps are passed through to shareholders, similar to the way income and losses of partnerships are passed through to partners.
  • Lower audit risk. Generally S corps are audited less frequently than sole proprietorships.
  • Tax deductible expenses. Business expenses may be tax-deductible.
  • Self-employment tax savings. An S corp can offer self-employment tax savings, since owners who work for the business are classified as employees.

Limited Liability Company (LLC)

The main reasons for LLC Formation or Limited Liability Company organization are lawsuit protection, credibility, tax savings, deductible employee benefits, asset protection, anonymity, the ease of raising capital, creating a separate legal entity for personal protection, Forming an LLC has a broad range of powers beyond that of a sole proprietorship, small claims court benefits, separate liability for corporate debts, and perpetual duration. After LLC Formation or LLC incorporation you create a separate legal person. You are a shareholder. You can control the corporation. However, when your business is sued you can be protected from being sued personally after Forming an LLC or LLC Formation.

Sole proprietor

A sole proprietorship is a business that is owned and operated by a natural person (individual). This is the simplest form of business entity. The sole proprietorship is not a legal entity. The business has no existence separate from the owner who is called the proprietor. The owner must include the income from such business in his or her own income tax return and is responsible for the payment of taxes thereon. A sole proprietorship can operate under the name of its owner or it can do business under a fictitious name. The fictitious name is simply a trade name–it does not create a legal entity separate from the sole proprietor owner. Only the proprietor has the authority to make decisions for the business. The proprietor assumes the risks of the business to the extent of all of his or her assets whether used in the business or not.

Disadvantage :

  • Unlimited liability of the owner
    The owner is legally liable for all the debts of the business. Not only the investment or business property, but any personal and fixed property may be attached by creditors. The owner signs contracts in his or her own name, because the sole proprietorship has no separate identity under the law.
  • imited ability to raise capital
    The business capital is limited to whatever the owner can personally secure. This limits the expansion of a business when new capital is required. A common cause for failure of this form of business organisation is a lack of funds. This restricts the ability of a sole proprietor (owner) to operate the business effectively and survive at an initial low profit level, or to get through an economic “rough spot
  • ​Limited skills
    One owner alone has limited skills, although he or she may be able to hire employees with sought-after skills.